Monday, January 27, 2014

The Power of Introverts




I'm an introvert. I can admit this with no guilt or shame - I am who I am. I much prefer to spend time alone ( in my room or a library ) with books, the internet, music, and just my own company. Cats welcome, but humans usually not.

In today's society and throughout most of the world, being extroverted is prized as the more superior or desirable trait to have. Introverts like myself are seen as weird, social outcasts, loners, or at worst - problems to be fixed. Most of the self-help books you pick up today promote socializing and group work and being outgoing, something that often times doesn't work for those of us who prefer to curl up with a good book rather than go out for drinks on a Wednesday night.

But there's nothing wrong with being introverted. Not at all.

I'm gonna go out on a limb here and suppose that most of us dark little cookies fall closer to the introvert side of the spectrum. I'm going to assume that most of us prefer to spend time with our close friends or family, doing our own thing. Maybe you're into reading, maybe it's music, or maybe it's heading out into the unknown with just your camera.

But in all that time alone you're allowing your mind to expand and grow, to become more as a person, an intellectual even. Possibly why those in the Goth community are considered higher up on the "smarts" scale. Some pretty innovative ideas and solutions have come from more introverted minds. Some of the greatest literature in the last century came from introverts. Most of our technology was born from the minds of introverts. There's power there in solitude.

So the next time someone tells you to get out more, to talk to people more, or be more outgoing, just keep in mind that YOU might be the next great inventor and YOUR mind might change the world.

Now, I'm gonna get back to my textbook on American dialects. Laterz! 

8 comments:

  1. I'm definitely an introvert. But mixed with my anxiety that doesn't always mesh well. When I'm genuinely excited about doing something with people I convince myself not to go. It's not fun waking up and realising that you have no friends left because you're never around.

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    1. I know exactly how you feel, I'm totally the same way.

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  2. Hear hear! :) I'm also sure that many of the darker mindset are introverts. Sometimes I get really sick of family members who chat and making sounds around me all the time, I'm happy to have my own studio in the basement to be creative or study in. At work I pretend to be an extrovert. I have my own office but it's a cutym not to close the door and that's very disturbing.

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    1. That's one thing that bothered me about living in a traditional dorm room my first year of college. The CA was adamant about people keeping their doors open so other residents couldn't pop in and chat. That just didn't work for me.

      Luckily my roommate also liked her privacy so our door remained closed most often. :)

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    2. Leave your door open ALL THE TIME? So people can look in? What if you are in PJs or cutting your nails or eating with crumbs all over your face? OMG, the horror! I like my privacy! I like to choose when to interact! I guess maybe it's a good thing I never got uni housing.

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  3. Thank you for writing this post. :D

    As a introvert myself, I feel better to know that it's completely fine and normal to be alone sometimes. Maybe it's a bit off for my future profession, but we'll see where it takes me.

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  4. I'm lucky to have many introvert friends who understand when one of us just doesn't feel like meeting up and would prefer staying in. I hate having to make up excuses when people ask me to go out and don't understand that I need some alone time every now and then.

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  5. I think a lot of people think I am an extovert. I can talk for hours about books, some movies, Gothic or Victorian stuff. Also with effort I can come off very perky. But it takes effort. I am comfortable around most of my close friends, but strangers, crowds, etc, I don't really like as much. Still, I can be so friendly and helpful that people can never tell if I am uncomfortable and it has never affected me jobwise.

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